California Association of Sunbeam Tiger Owners Forum

Go Back   California Association of Sunbeam Tiger Owners Forum > Tiger Technical - Personalized/Modified > Engine
New Threads

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-20-2016, 09:00 PM
1966 TGR 1966 TGR is offline
Administrator
Member of C.A.T.
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Huntington Beach
Posts: 59
Default Can a Tiger survive 118 degrees?

The answer is yes.

Returning from Tigers United Monday morning I had an appointment with the curator of the Mullen Museum in Oxnard. This is a spectacular museum which has many racing and street Bugattis as well as the Bugatti that was resurrected from the bottom of Lake Maggiore and left as is on display.

It was well worth an extended visit, and I have confidence in my cooling system, so at 1 pm, I embarked up the Conejo Grade in 110 degrees, then through Calabasas and west San Fernando Valley where it hit 118!!. I have a digital outside temp gauge mounted on insulation behind the front grille. Stop and go traffic up Sepulveda pass at 109 degrees. Temp never went over 200. so it can be done. The weak link wasn't the car, it's the driver melting inside of it!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-20-2016, 09:12 PM
Doug C's Avatar
Doug C Doug C is offline
Gold Forum Member
Member of C.A.T.
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Southern California
Posts: 413
Default

Please share what you attribute your car staying so cool. If you care to share what have to done to your car.

Thanks - Doug
__________________
1964 Mark1 born July 10, 1964 "Wedgewood Blue"
1966 Shelby GT 350 "Red and Gold" Hertz
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-20-2016, 10:45 PM
Warren's Avatar
Warren Warren is offline
Administrator
Member of C.A.T.
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: South Torrance, West of P.C.H.
Posts: 2,308
Default Me too

I went through it too but about noon. I had same fun but can't trust my gauge, it's way off when in operating temperature. I stopped used I/R gun and read 190. The stock gauge really sucks or I've gotta try a different sensor. I felt worse and car felt better as I pulled heater on and left hood unlatched to be safe. Should have stuck to US 1 wow.

The ride up was actually chilly and what a change it was.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-21-2016, 11:06 AM
1966 TGR 1966 TGR is offline
Administrator
Member of C.A.T.
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Huntington Beach
Posts: 59
Default tiger cooling

Glad to provide the info. It's pretty much everything we have seen over the years from a number of contributors. For reference, the engine is a 289, putting out 280 hp at rear wheels, so significant heat generator. Edelbrock heads and intake manifold.

-- Stock radiator, carefully cleaned and tested. Copper and brass are better conductors of heat than aluminum, so if has a good core, it should be fine.
--14 PSI radiator cap
--Horn block-off plates
--Lower valence ducting and cross member sealing to prevent recirculation of hot air under the radiator.
--Ford 14 inch 6 blade steel fan with stock shroud. Shroud is important for fan to work efficiently.
--Smaller diameter Ford Fairmont water pump pulley (there's a fellow who makes nice machined equivalents)
--Edebrock water pump.
--180 degree thermostat (lower temp 160 degree is actually thermodynamically counterproductive and a thermostat should always be used)
--30 percent antifreeze. 70 percent distilled water. (water is better heat conductor)
-- Gano filter, checked and cleaned periodically.
--12 inch thermostatically controlled electric fan set for 200 degrees. (almost never comes on except in the worst traffic, and probably not crucial if all else is done)
-- Autometer 2254 sending unit. Pretty accurate and can be slightly calibrated with a few ohms of resistance in series.
-- I don't have an LAT hood with outlet vents, but it certainly helps to get the hot air out.

Besides the really obvious things to prevent recirculation of hot air through the radiator, I feel the most dramatic improvement was from the water pump, 6 blade fan and pulley.

How to cool the driver is the next challenge!.

Last edited by 1966 TGR; 06-21-2016 at 04:55 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-21-2016, 11:27 AM
Doug C's Avatar
Doug C Doug C is offline
Gold Forum Member
Member of C.A.T.
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Southern California
Posts: 413
Default Thanks

Thanks I'am sure that this will not only help me BUT many others on this site as well.
__________________
1964 Mark1 born July 10, 1964 "Wedgewood Blue"
1966 Shelby GT 350 "Red and Gold" Hertz
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-21-2016, 02:13 PM
pushrod pushrod is offline
Bronze Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Bridgend, South Wales, UK.
Posts: 30
Default

Good information, thanks.

I'm one of the British cars that's planning to come over for next years TU. I was thinking of driving through Death Valley on to Vegas after the event. The idea would be to tackle the desert early in the morning and stop at Furnace Creek overnight. Then early morning drive to Vegas.

I'm running a 260 with around 220 bhp, aluminium racing spec radiator, flexi fan and electric fan. Horn holes etc blocked off, and an LAT hood. I'll fit a different thermostat and reduce the amount of antifreeze next spring, maybe add some Water Wetter as well.

What pressure radiator cap would you recommend?

Lou.
__________________
1965 Mk1 Tiger 260
1963 Ford Falcon Sprint
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-21-2016, 04:21 PM
Warren's Avatar
Warren Warren is offline
Administrator
Member of C.A.T.
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: South Torrance, West of P.C.H.
Posts: 2,308
Default 50/50

I thought it was a bigger deal to go 50/50 on the anti freeze from a corrosion standpoint. I have a 13 lb cap as that is probably the max with a stock heater core.

I really got caught out and have added back a expansion tank and a slightly larger capacity Fluidyne . I had a Davis that had the E tank nipple removed and welded over.

Mike suggested to me the kitchen counter test with a candy thermometer then adding resistors but I've worn out my welcome in the kitchen and have taken the position that a coffee can or small pot and a torch heat to boil would be a good in car method. Gary H in Oregon gave me that idea.

I wanted to get a good start on a closer match resistance sending unit. Thanks Mike, and Gary
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06-21-2016, 04:54 PM
1966 TGR 1966 TGR is offline
Administrator
Member of C.A.T.
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Huntington Beach
Posts: 59
Default

Pushrod: you are brave. Palm Springs was 122. They don't even report Death Valley on our weather, because it's always ridiculously hot. I definitely recommend "overdriving" the fan and pump with a smaller pulley if you can find one.

Warren, yes 50/50 is ideal for corrosion, but my radiator guy said 30 percent is plenty and of course still protects to well below freezing for us here in the southwest. I don't think it's a critical part of the equation so if you are more comfy with 40/60 or 50/50, go ahead. I'm running a 14 pound cap.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 06-21-2016, 08:07 PM
Hoghead Hoghead is offline
Gold Forum Member
Member of C.A.T.
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 212
Default

--Smaller diameter Ford Fairmont water pump pulley (there's a fellow who makes nice machined equivalents)


Do you have any contact info?
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 06-22-2016, 08:31 AM
Warren's Avatar
Warren Warren is offline
Administrator
Member of C.A.T.
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: South Torrance, West of P.C.H.
Posts: 2,308
Default Gent in Ohio Fan pulley MFG

Prior to the trip I had checked with Robert W. in Ohio .

Today, I followed up with the following results.

He is out of stock and considering another production run stay tuned.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:56 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 2
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
California Association of Sunbeam Tiger Owners